Classic War Hero Movies

In today’s confusion about who is a War Hero and who is not, let’s go back to some classic Hollywood definitions of War Heroes and the movies that portrayed them. This week, MovieZoot.com features four such movies including 1989’s Casablanca Express with Glenn Ford, 1987’s Escape from Sobibor with Rutger Hauer, 1943’s Gung Ho! with Randolph Scott, and 1986’s The Last Days of Patton with George C. Scott.

Allow these historical and classic movies to again define the term “War Hero” in today’s context.

Yours truly,
MovieZoot.com
Where you’ll find Movies you love with Stars you know.

Casablanca Express

Casablanca Express is the 1989 Sergio Martino War Drama starring Glenn Ford, Jason Connery and Donald Pleasence telling the story of Sir Winston Churchill’s infamous train trip to Casablanca in 1942 during the height of WWII, to meet with FDR and Joseph Stalin when the German’s knew the details of his travel plans and were planning an assassination, and America’s effort to thwart the Germans.

Escape from Sobibor

Escape from Sobibor is the 1987 Jack Gold historical War Drama starring Rutger Hauer and Alan Arkin telling the story of the infamous 1943 escape of 600 men from the German Death Camp of Sobibor with the most successful uprising by Jewish prisoners during WWII.

Gung Ho!

Gung Ho! is the 1943 black & white Ray Enright War Drama starring Randolph Scott based on the real-life story of the Makin Island raid led by Lieutenant Colonel Evans Carlson’s 2nd Marine Raider Battalion. The film uses stock footage of the time with Chet Huntley narrating the events leading up to the raid.

The Last Days of Patton

The Last Days of Patton is the 1986 Delbert Mann War-Hero sequel to the 1970 blockbuster Patton which stars George C. Scott and Eva Marie Saint as General George S. Patton and his wife during the last days of his life, where Patton was writing the official history of WWII, and despite monumental efforts by President Harry S. Truman to have him not die on German soil, the General dies of an embolism on December 21st, 1945.